The first big Mardi Gras parade of the season rolls on Saturday when the Krewe of Centaur begins on the Parkway in downtown Shreveport. Here are the top 5 ways to make sure you catch lots of beads and trinkets.

 

  • 1

    Kid on a Ladder

    If you build a special wooden box and attach it to a ladder, the children inside the box will get pummeled with beads. All you will have to do is scoop them up. Warning: make sure the ladder is stable and someone is holding on to it the entire time!

    Tina Rose
  • 2

    Any Kind of Target

    Float riders love to throw at something specific. So if you have a basketball net attached to a garbage bag, you'll get loads of beads. Some people even make a target with a bag attached to the back of it. That's a sure fire way to be successful at Mardi Gras.

    Roger Smithson
  • 3

    Girls in Bikinis

    This is more a tradition in New Orleans, but it's growing in popularity here. Many of the float riders are guys and they love to throw beads and specialty items to the hot girls in the crowd. One little secret, these girls can't catch, so all you have to do is stand near them for all the stuff that hits the ground.

    Roger Smithson
  • 4

    Kids with No Beads on their Necks

    Lots of kids like to pile the beads around their neck. This is not a good thing. We love to throw to children who look like they have no beads. Give your youngsters a bag to carry around to put the beads in. This way when we spot their little faces in the crowd, we will be sure to throw to them.

    Roger Smithson
  • 5

    Grandma in the Back of the Crowd in a Chair

    This is my favorite target. These folks don't want to get out of their chairs, but they love being out with the crowd enjoying the Mardi Gras. For float riders, this is a tough target, because you have to hit them in the chest. You don't want to hit her in the face. And she's not going to bend over and pick beads up that land around her feet. Hanging around the old folks toward the back of the crowd is a good spot to snag beads off the ground.

    Roger Smithson