As millions Americans are worried as to why they didn't receive their stimulus money yet, there's something of importance you might not have heard about yet. Did you know about the IRS's self-imposed January 15 cutoff to send the second stimulus check?

The IRS says that if you received your first stimulus payment via direct deposit, and none of your banking information has changed since, then there's nothing you need to do to receive your 2021 stimulus payment.

However, many people are reporting they received their first stimulus check on time without any problems, but haven't received their second stimulus deposit.

Some people are also reporting that somehow their stimulus payment has been deposited into the wrong account, has been credited to an EIP card they no longer have, and numerous other issues so far.

 

So, what's all this about about a self imposed January 15 cutoff date for the IRS to send out stimulus payments?

From cnet.com -

"The language of the $900 billion stimulus bill has set Jan. 15 as the cutoff date to send stimulus payments. If you don't receive your full second stimulus check money by then, you will need to claim all or part of the missing amount when you file your federal tax returns in 2021 through the IRS' Recovery Rebate Credit. You'll also be able to claim any money the IRS still owes you from the first round of checks."

With the first payments having gone out December 29, 2020, this leaves the IRS barely over two weeks total to process a potential 100 million payments or more.

Seems like they should have given themselves a bit more time if possible, don't ya think?

Clearly for people who are in need of their stimulus payments now, the above issue is not a welcomed one, to put it mildly.

If you're logging on to IRS.gov to try and track your stimulus payment via the "Get My Payment" portal and your seeing the "Payment #2 Status Not Available" message, try not to panic just yet. Hopefully it just means that your information hasn't been completely processed yet.

Get more information at cnet.com.