The ladies and gentlemen who prepare the preseason and early season tropical forecasts told us this was going to happen. Unfortunately for us. They were absolutely correct. They told us Hurricane Season 2020 would be one for the record books and their prognostications have been on point. Really on point. Take a look at this graphic.

 

Courtesy National Weather Service Corpus Christi

That's how much of the United States coast, at least on the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico side have been impacted by tropical weather this year. The impacts stretch from northern Maine through the big cities of the Northeast. They then wind down the Eastern Seaboard to Florida's Space Coast and into South Beach near Miami and the Florida Keys.

On the Gulf side of the warm tropical waters, we can see tropical impacts from far South Texas through the upper Texas coast on into Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and a small portion of the Florida Panhandle.

The only coastline that hasn't seen a tropical watch or warning this year is the Big Bend of Florida through the Suncoast, Cultural Coast, and Paradise Coast. So basically, they have been tropical storm-free from Panama City to almost Fort Myers.

Now comes the really scary part of this story. We are just now passing the halfway point of the Atlantic Hurricane Season. We still have all of September, October, and November to get through.

If there is a bit of good news in all of this it's that the peak of the Hurricane Season is basically here. We should start to see, hopefully, a decrease in tropical activity as we move through the last week of September into early October. It's after that second week in October that things usually calm down.

However, this is 2020 and so far it's been a year we'd all like to forget. Let's hope we won't have one more big storm to remember or even a bunch of smaller storms to think about. Quite frankly, I am tired and am looking forward to the all to warm and all too humid days of Christmas.