Most of the time, allergies are not an issue for me. I have many life challenges, for sure. However, in this regard I drew a semi-long straw. That is, unless it's that magical first time in October when everything is cooler and pleasant and lovely. Then, I inevitably feel horrible for a week or two.

Allergies manifest in different ways for different people--yep, like a wheel of misfortune. For some, it's the itchy, watering eyes and sneezing. For others, their asthma flares. It can also cause an upset tummy. Hives could manifest. Yeah all around just lots of "fun."

So, what can we do to do our best to manage this festival of fall allergy fun? We've heard some of these, but it's easy to forget.

If your skin is particularly sensitive to the ragweed and other irritants, just wearing protective clothing can help. It seems obvious, but when it's still warm outside in East Texas, we don't necessarily want to wear long sleeves, but it can help--especially if you're working outside. You may want to consider a hat or something to cover your face, as well. Get a bandana. You'll be protecting yourself and look pretty gangster cool doing it.

Speaking of being outside, when you come back in wash off that pollen. Everydayhealth.com reports this recommendation from Dr. Frederick M. Schaffer, the chief medical officer at United Allergy Services in San Antonio. He goes so far as to recommend changing shoes when you come in, as well. This can help cut down on the pollen you're tracking into your home. Heck, you may even want to take a shower. Plus, if you've been working in the yard, you might need one anyway. ;)

One thing that I personally find very helpful is a dehumidifier. Humidifiers are very helpful with breathing issues, but not if you're allergic to what that humidity enables--the proliferation and thriving of molds and dust mites. Yikes. So that dehumidifier takes away their happy place. Which is good--for you. Not for them. Which is good.

Obviously if your allergies are to the point where you really should see a doctor--then go. If they prescribe medications--take them. I can't tell you how many people I know have allergy meds that they won't take and then wonder why their allergies are off the rails.

Check out these additional tips to relieve your fall allergy symptoms from WebMD.com

Also, stock up on a little extra Kleenex, too. ;)